the nomad’s unique blend of high-low hospitality

“The NoMad is a far cry from the sleek, modern aesthetic that one might expect from one of the city’s trendiest spaces. Rather, it serves as a stylish and mysterious refuge from the bustle of the city. Step inside, and you’ll be enveloped in the moody glow of dark wood, rich textiles, and ornate lighting. One could almost call the vibe “old world,” if the environs weren’t typically inhabited by trendy New Yorkers and the international jet set. 

 Image compliments of the NoMad Hotel & Restaurant.

Image compliments of the NoMad Hotel & Restaurant.

But don’t let the posh vibe fool you—The NoMad’s enduring appeal stems from attentive, welcoming service that adapts to a diverse clientele (and it’s no wonder; after all, this is the same team behind World’s Best Restaurant, Eleven Madison Park).”

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eater's digest: a short and useful history of restaurant reviews

"When choosing a restaurant, whose opinion do you typically trust? A personal friend? Reviews by strangers on Yelp? The opinions of individual critics in newspapers, magazines or digital publications? Perhaps you use a combination of these mediums, or even all of them. But it’s likely you’ve never thought about where the tradition of reviewing restaurants originated, or how the logistics behind this practice shapes the way we think about food.

 PHOTO BY ANTONIO DIAZ

PHOTO BY ANTONIO DIAZ

I’ve worked on-the-ground with restaurateurs and seen the effects of reviews in-action; yet most diners don’t have a sense of how this all plays out from a thirty-thousand-foot view. This abbreviated guide to the history of culinary criticism—from the 1800s to current times—may provide some interesting perspective in navigating the different channels of choosing a restaurant in our digital age."

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how "natural" is changing the wine industry

"Throughout history, numerous experts and critics have attempted to codify the mysterious world of wine, developing rating systems to guide novice drinkers in forming opinions about what constitutes a good or a bad bottle. In turn, readers shared these opinions with friends and family, reinforcing the notion that there was a right and a wrong way to drink and think about wine.

 PHOTO BY CASEY FEEHAN

PHOTO BY CASEY FEEHAN

Yet in recent years, more sommeliers and winemakers are challenging this status quo. Their personal opinions may (or may not) adhere to traditional codes of what a “good” wine tastes like, and in fact, a greater diversity of opinion is exactly what they are trying to cultivate. Yet the most radical idea these professionals present isn’t that casual drinkers should trust their own sense of taste; it’s that customers should know—and care—about what is actually in the bottle."

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