coffee meets pastry in portugal

“When asked to describe Portuguese cuisine, the average American will find themselves stumped. Even those who have personally visited the country often offer a limited menu: bacalhau, port wine, pastéis de nata, tinned fish. The truth is, for a country whose naval and trading prowess influenced so much of European cuisine—from the import of tea, spices and beyond—the culinary culture of Portugal itself is rarely celebrated outside the country’s own borders.

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As for Portuguese coffee culture, one would be forgiven for imagining a hand-me-down smattering of Italy’s espresso culture or France’s leisurely, intellectual cafés. In an effort to dig deeper, we sought the guidance of Maria Sena and Bruno Carvalho, Porto natives and founders of Amass. Cook. These former research scientists bring an analytical approach to their culinary writing and guided tours, diving into not only the what, but also the why behind the region’s unique traditions.”

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the slice is right

“The first step of researching New York City pizza is preparing yourself for a piping hot debate. No matter who you talk to in the pie and slice game, you’re signing up for an opinionated serving of family feuds, insider trading, and drama worthy of a daytime soap. But beyond the he-said, she-said and questions of who deserves credit for what, one incontestable fact remains: there’s just something about the NYC slice.

The “Freddy Prince” square pie at Paulie Gee’s Slice Shop | Talking pizza with Paulie Gee.

The “Freddy Prince” square pie at Paulie Gee’s Slice Shop | Talking pizza with Paulie Gee.

From lunch on-the-go to drunken late-night eats, slice pizza is intimately woven into the city’s fabric. Every few blocks in Manhattan—and only a bit further in Brooklyn or Queens—you’re bound to run into a grab-n-go shop. The most celebrated names in the old guard—Joe’s or DiFara, for example—ring with the time-worn familiarity of local heroes. But in the past decade, an increasing number of noteworthy upstarts have thrown their hat in the ring—Prince Street, Best Pizza and Scarr’s, to name a few.”

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eco-friendly efforts in new york

“The #strawban has gone national. Some states have banned single-use plastic bags. Your coffee shop may even offer discounts when you bring a reusable mug. But how do we, as diners, make eco-friendlier choices when we eat out? And what can we realistically expect from leaders in the field? I sat down with three entrepreneurs in New York City to learn how they’ve built sustainability into their business plans, where local infrastructure has helped (or hurt), and what diners should know about where they can make an impact.”

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A special thank you to entrepreneurs Chloe Vichot, Camilla Marcus and Erin Patinkin for sharing their stories.

Read more at LifeandThyme.com